“The Iris”: a celebration of ephemeral art by Rebecca Louise Law

10000 fresh irises floating inside NOW Gallery for British artist Rebecca Louise Law's exhibition

London, UK

#Art & Culture

img.0 All images by Charles Emerson

Within NOW Gallery on London’s Greenwich Peninsula, British artist Rebecca Louise Law has suspended 10,000 fresh irises with copper wire, making them appear to float within the gallery space. ‘The Iris’ continues Law’s ongoing investigation of floral forms and their gradual evolution through the stages of beauty and decay. A vibrant palette of blue, purple, yellow and white flowers is hosted within the gallery, drawing nature into the site. ‘I like to capture and cherish small beautiful natural objects to create an artwork that can be observed without the pressure of time,’ Law says. ‘Preserving, treasuring, celebrating and sharing the beauty of the earth with the world is what drives me.’
img.1 ‘The Iris’ by Rebecca Louise Law at NOW Gallery, Greenwich Peninsula.

Interested in the biological facets of the land that NOW Gallery sits on — previously a wetland of tidal marshes — Law walked along the banks of Greenwich Peninsula and collected some of its native marsh reed plants. While she was keen to work with this species for the installation, its heavy shed of pollen proved too difficult to work with. So, in looking at the history of marshland plants, Law chose the iris — a wetland species commonly known as a springtime flower — to celebrate its striking features and native qualities.
img.2 10,000 fresh irises are carefully hung from the ceiling with copper wire

Hanging from the gallery ceiling, the flowers dry over the course of the exhibition, which runs until May 7, 2017. Viewers are given the opportunity to engage with the stages of life and decay, observing the process of preservation and artist’s ongoing exploration of ephemerality. ‘We are fascinated to see how her exhibition will evolve over the three months in the gallery from fresh blooms to dried flowers hanging poetically from the ceiling in an unpredictable and sculptural way’, Jemima Burrill, NOW Gallery curator says.
img.3 The blooms seem to float within the gallery space
img.4 The installation continues Law’s ongoing investigation of floral forms and their stages of life and death
img.5 A vibrant palette of blue, purple, yellow and white flowers is hosted within the gallery
img.6 Law walked along the banks of Greenwich Peninsula to study its native plants
img.7 The artist chose the iris to celebrate its striking features and native qualities
img.8 Hanging from the gallery ceiling, the flowers dry over the course of the exhibition
img.9 Until May 7, 2017, the flowers will shift through the stages of life and decay
img.10 Viewers can observe the process of preservation and artist’s ongoing exploration of ephemerality
img.11 The artist installing elements of ‘The Iris’
img.12 ‘I like to capture and cherish small beautiful natural objects’, Law says

For further information visit designboom.